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THE CREAMERY, 1930s
The roof name was removed in 1939 to avoid aiding German bombers
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FLEET VEHICLES
In the 1960s, around 4000 gallons of milk arrived on site each day. Most of the milk was picked up by fleet vehicles from hundreds churn stands around Devon, and transported through the county's narrow lanes. Farmers made made an additional 1d /gallon by arranging their own delivery. A "sniffer" was employed to ensure that each churn of milk was fresh.
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THE UNLOADING BAY
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TIPPING VERANDAH
Cans arrived by rail. The sound of them being tipped often echoed down the Yeo valley in the early hours of the morning. The windows to the left were offices.
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MILK COOLING PLANT
Milk was tested by the before being allowed into the plant. It was then cooled before processing began.
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THE BUTTER ROOM
The original butter making process (with Percy Butt?) before high-volume automation
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BUTTER MAKING
The original butter making process was modernised on purchase of a large stainless steel churn. The outlet flow is being controlled by Harry Stentiford (left).
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BUTTER MAKING
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ROLLER DRYING
Milk was passed between pairs of steam-heated rollers to make a thin, dry sheet which was broken up and milled. This Just-Hatman process is being used in this picture for the production of Ambrosia Infant Milk Powder. Sid Manse and Nigel Roesland are on the right.
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"We used to clear the sheets by breaking them off the rollers and tipping them into a small bin, then scooping it into another container and eventually it came out as milk powder"-Barbara Stentiford

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FILLING AREA
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THE CANNING LINE
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LATER CANNING LINE
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THE PLANT ROOM
The factory originally had no mains electricity and generated all its own power
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